Ingredients for life on Saturn’s moon may be ‘tip of the iceberg’

Saturn moon Enceladus

There are likely to be many more ingredients for life on Saturn’s moon Enceladus than those identified so far, says Dr Frank Postberg from the University of Heidelberg, Germany, the lead author of a paper published on 27 June which revealed the presence of complex carbon-based molecules in the moon’s core. He says a fresh mission could … Read more

Microsatellite swarms could paint clearer picture of our planet

Microsatellites such as those developed by ICEYE not only reduce the size of the satellite but also cut costs significantly.

by Gareth Willmer Tiny, low-cost satellites that can work together to boost their output and a technology that reduces the loss of satellite data are two of the latest innovations to hit the Earth observation market – and the results promise to reveal a more detailed image of our planet. Space is not just a … Read more

Supercomputers and space-based laser to help predict extreme weather events

Extreme weather events such as heavy storms are becoming more common.

From droughts and forest fires to floods and big freezes, extreme weather events are on the rise. But to what extent are these linked to climate change? Just months before the world’s first wind monitoring satellite enters orbit, scientists have finalised a climate model with exceptional resolution, and the new tools will help identify how … Read more

‘I opened a bottle with Stephen Hawking to celebrate our eureka moment’ – Prof. Thomas Hertog

A new model by Stephen Hawking and Thomas Hertog says that the universe is more uniform and simpler than scientists had previously believed.

A theory developed with the late Professor Stephen Hawking stating that the universe is more simple and uniform than current models suggest was so shocking that it had to be sat on for a while before it was released to the world, according to co-author Professor Thomas Hertog from KU Leuven in Belgium. He and … Read more

SKA ‘time machine’ will be able to detect formation of first stars, galaxies  

The Square Kilometre Array, which is depicted through an artist's impression, will begin construction in 2020.

The world’s largest radio telescope, known as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and situated over two continents, will be able to detect the first stars and galaxies emerging from the ‘murk’ at the beginning of the universe and much more besides, according to Professor Phil Diamond, Director General of SKA. He spoke to Horizon at … Read more